Fatigue is one of the main reasons why cancer survivors choose not to exercise.

Among survivors, it’s common for those tired feelings to become a “vicious cycle” because when you feel tired, you usually just want to lie down and rest. However, studies have shown that this can actually make you feel even more tired.

Strange as it may sound, exercise is one way you can break that cycle of fatigue.

Research suggests the symptoms of tiredness can be reduced by just 30 minutes of brisk walking (and these 30 minutes can be broken into three 10-minute sessions throughout the day). So, if you’re feeling tired, here are a few tips to help you maintain your activity regime:

Notice the days and times of the day when you feel least tired and choose those times of the day to undertake your physical activity.

If need be, decrease the intensity at which you are exercising. If you are walking at a fast pace, then slow it down or reduce how

  • Notice the days and times of the day when you feel least tired and choose those times of the day to undertake your physical activity.
  • If need be, decrease the intensity at which you are exercising. If you are walking at a fast pace, then slow it down or reduce how far you’re walking each time.

If you experience any soreness from exercise, know that this is a common occurrence. Exercising, especially when you’re just starting out, can result in a dull, achy feeling in your muscles, which is usually felt around 24 to 48 hours later. You can minimise this by:

  • starting your program slowly
  • avoiding over-exercising (i.e. don’t go too hard in a short period of time)
  • doing a warm up and cool down every time, which includes gentle stretching exercises
  • ensuring you don’t exercise every single day, as this gives your body the time it needs to recover and relax.

This information is sourced from: Behavioural Med Lab

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